Hundreds of media accounts were just deplatformed. The need for a decentralized web is greater than ever.

Over the past few days Facebook and Twitter have deplatformed hundreds of accounts with millions of followers in total under the guise of fighting “clickbait” and “spam”. The Washington Post reports:

Facebook said on Thursday it purged more than 800 U.S. publishers and accounts for flooding users with politically-oriented spam, reigniting accusations of political censorship and arbitrary decision-making.

In doing so, Facebook demonstrated its increased willingness to wade into the thorny territory of policing domestic political activity. Some of the accounts had been in existence for years, had amassed millions of followers, and professed support for conservative or liberal ideas…

Just one day after the Facebook purge, Twitter followed suit, deplatforming the accounts of alternative media outlets Anti-Media and The Free Thought Project. Sputnik International reports:

Anti-Media and TFTP aren’t automated bot accounts or spammers. They are run by US citizens who used the internet applications Twitter and Facebook to exercise their First Amendment rights. For that they have been punished — first by Facebook, now by Twitter.

I have friends who were caught up in these purges. Their audiences have been significantly reduced because of this deplatforming. I am generally opposed to “censorship” by media platforms, preferring that readers use their power to mute or block content they do not like rather than have their web browsing experience curated by paternalistic algorithms and “content moderation” teams.

That said, we have to recognize the reality of the situation we find ourselves in: Facebook and Twitter are platforms owned by private companies who have the freedom and the right to deplatform any content they do not like.

https://twitter.com/lightcoin/status/1026688238281482240

The alternative is website owners being forced by the State to host content they disagree with, which seems even worse than the status quo. Hypothetical Lockean squatters rights aside, today’s legal regime supports a company’s right to moderate content off of their platform. So what can we do to protect ourselves from sudden deplatforming by social media administrators?

We get rid of social media administrators.

The future of social media, and the web itself, is decentralized. The same way bitcoin is a decentralized, open protocol that enables anyone to send and receive money without intermediaries, social media platforms will become decentralized protocols that enable anyone to publish and read without intermediaries. The web gets us most of the way there, but there are still vulnerable choke points, such as centralized servers that host content and the ICANN-owned domain name system that routes web requests.

The decentralized web is removing these choke points and replacing them with open protocols that advance the vision of the web’s inventors and early pioneers. Platforms like Blockstack and Ethereum are taking the vision of the web and building in censorship resistance that is stronger than anything possible with the technology of prior generations.

Using BNS and ENS, you can own a domain name that no corporation or government can take away from you. Using Gaia and Swarm you can self-host and back up your content on multiple geographically diverse hosts, preventing take-down by would-be censors. And rather than rely on the good graces of payment processors like PayPal to earn your keep on the web, you can get paid for your content directly by your fans using Lightning and Connext.

Putting this all together, what does the decentralized social media platform of the future look like? It could look like Afari, a Twitter-like application built on Blockstack:

lightcoin_afari2.png

Or it could look like Akasha, a Medium-like application built on Ethereum:

lightcoin_akasha.png

To be sure, it’s early days for these platforms, so they’re not quite ready for prime time yet. And in all likelihood, they could go the way of previous decentralized platforms that attempted to take on the centralized social media giants: at best a niche curiosity, at worst abandon-ware that gets buried in the graveyard of failed projects.

But what this new breed of open protocol-based platforms represents is a turning technological tide, where users don’t have to be sysadmins to take control of their data, where interfaces are familiar and functional, where censorship and deplatforming are nearly impossible. In this world, publishers can post without fear and have a direct relationship with their audience, secure in the fact that no third party can unilaterally take away their online voice and reach.

If you have any motivation to help – whether with design, development, documentation, or testing skills, or even just providing moral or financial support to these projects – I urge you to get involved. The decentralized web wasn’t mature enough yet to save the hundreds of accounts that were just purged by Facebook and Twitter and the many that have been purged before. But maybe, with your help, we can prevent something like this from ever happening again.

Reach out any time through my contact page or the comment section below, let me know how you’d like to help, and I’ll try to point you in the right direction. You can also click through any of the links to projects mentioned above to get in touch with them directly.

Thanks to all involved with organizing and supporting the Decentralized Web Summit.


Email is probably the most popular decentralized messaging protocol. Add yourself to my email contacts if you would like to stay in touch!

New year, new job 2018 edition

I have some exciting – if somewhat belated – news to share. As you could probably tell from the title of this post, I have a new job. In November I accepted an offer to join the Aragon team as their new Community Lead!

aragon

Aragon is a project that I have been following since I first met the co-founder Luis Cuende at a Blockstack meetup in San Francisco. I was excited when they released the alpha version of their testnet client in early 2017 and blown away when they went on to raise $25 million later that year in the fourth-largest crowdfund and the second-largest token sale at the time.

After leaving Abra in July 2017, I took a few months off to explore the cryptocurrency space and see what other opportunities were out there. I considered several offers but kept my options open. The market had changed significantly since my last job search less than a year earlier. One significant change was that there were many projects outside of the Bay Area hiring for remote positions. Aragon was one of those projects.

I reconnected with the Aragon team while I was attending the Crypto-Economic Security Conference in Berkeley, CA. Zooko Wilcox, CEO of Zcash, knew I was looking for a job and had generously offered me one of the tickets his company was given for sponsoring the sold-out event. I accepted the ticket and went to the event, looking forward to meeting new crypto people in the Bay Area and watching interesting talks by the presenters.

I was surprised and delighted to meet María Gómez, Strategy and Operations Lead at Aragon, in person at the event (we’d previously met online while I was working at Abra). María asked what I was doing at the time. I told her I was looking for a new full-time gig, something in a marketing or community role. She told me that Aragon was hiring a Community Lead to replace their then-Community Lead Tatu Kärki, who was transitioning into a Communications Lead role. The rest, as they say, is history.

Within a few weeks, I had gone through several rounds of interviews and flew to Finland to do a trial week with Luis and Tatu. We worked on several community projects throughout the week, and on what would have been Thanksgiving day in the US, they offered me something to be extra thankful for: an opportunity to join the Aragon team as their new Community Lead. I gladly accepted, and have been dutifully serving the Aragon community ever since. Join us!

P.S. Aragon is hiring!

New job FAQ

Congrats on the new job! What does Aragon do?

Thanks! Aragon is building a platform that makes it easy to create and participate in Decentralized Autonomous Organizations, or “DAOs” for short. In the future, the Aragon project itself will be run as a DAO on the Ethereum blockchain. The Aragon DAO will be governed by holders of Aragon Network Tokens (ANT), an ERC-20 token that was sold in mid-2017 to raise the funds needed to develop the Aragon software.

Is $ANT a good buy?

Maybe! DYOR.

What’s it like being part of an Ethereum project?

Although I’ve been following the Ethereum project since its inception in 2013, I haven’t been closely involved since the very early days. After leaving Abra I took some time to explore all the projects that have formed in ecosystem in the intervening time. Many of the smart contract applications that first got me excited about Ethereum have begun to come to fruition, including p2p prediction markets, asset exchanges, gambling platforms, and, my personal favorite, DAOs. This, along with the amazing team that Luis and Jorge have assembled, is what led me to join Aragon.

Now is a very exciting time to be involved in the open-source cryptocurrency community. There’s no shortage of funding for extremely ambitious projects, including important blockchain research and development work. It seems like the only limitation right now is the supply of engineering talent and the imagination necessary to build the p2p future so many of us envision. I’m excited to help Aragon overcome these limitations in our own community and share what we create with the broader p2p ecosystem.

Are you still working with Bitseed?

Yes! I think 2018 will be a big year for Bitseed. We have started shipping orders for Bitseed 3, the next-generation version of our plug-and-play bitcoin full nodes. And we’ll also soon be relaunching our developer community so that devs who are interested in helping us improve Bitseed have an easy way to get involved and work together.

The kind of projects I’m really excited to work on with the Bitseed community include adding support for Layer 2 protocols such as Blockstack and the Lightning Network. Then Bitseed owners could have a node that not only secures their bitcoin transactions, but can also resolve decentralized domain names for them or even earn bitcoin by providing liquidity to the Lightning Network. Future work could even include using the node as a decentralized storage device or a crypto-incentivized mesh router. The possibilities are endless.

If you’re interested in helping us with any of these projects, please get in touch.

So what’s next for John Light?

Bitseed 3 ships this month, the Bitseed developer community relaunches shortly after, and Aragon goes live on Ethereum mainnet sometime in Q1/Q2 2018. I’ll probably be traveling a lot for Aragon community events this year, so if there are any cool crypto events you think I should be at let me know in the comments below or ping me on Twitter or @light in the Aragon Chat. To the moon! 🚀


Email is probably the most popular decentralized messaging protocol. Add yourself to my email contacts if you would like to stay in touch!

A Brief History of Blockchain Name Systems

This past weekend I attended the Aaron Swartz Day Hackathon at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. This event, which celebrates the life and work of Aaron Swartz, is organized in multiple cities around the world every year around the time of Aaron’s birthday (November 8). Since 2015, I have been attending the SF event and giving variations of a talk about blockchain name systems.

Here’s the description of this year’s talk:

Aaron Swartz once published a blog post entitled “Squaring the Triangle“, hypothesizing that a blockchain could be used to create a name system that had secure, decentralized, and human-readable names, thus “squaring” Zooko’s Triangle.

Since that post was published, numerous blockchain name systems have been developed, putting Aaron’s idea into practice. This talk will give a brief overview of the most popular blockchain name systems in production and show some of their applications.

Systems covered include Namecoin (the OG BNS), Blockstack, and the Ethereum Name System. Without further adieu, here’s a video of my talk from Aaron Swartz Day 2017 Day 2, A Brief History of Blockchain Name Systems.

Aaron was an incredibly inspiring individual, and it was a great honor to be invited to speak at this special event celebrating and building on his legacy. If you have a chance to attend one of these events in a city near you, I encourage you to go and participate!

RIP Aaron Swartz, you are gone but not forgotten.


Email is probably the most popular decentralized messaging protocol. Add yourself to my email contacts if you would like to stay in touch!